Jenny McCarthy – Bad for Latin America

The anti-vaccination foolishness in the US has repercussions that go far beyond a dramatic increase in entirely-preventable diseases in the US. To wit:

Brazil’s immunization program is one of the most impressive in the world. The government makes most of its own vaccines in the country and distributes them cheaply and universally, which led to a steep decline in infant mortality and deaths from infectious diseases after the national vaccination program started in the 1970s – one chart illustrating polio infection rates shows a complete drop-off a few years after national immunization campaigns. Now, though, Brazil is seeing small outbreaks of diseases like measles. But they aren’t homegrown – they’re reportedlycoming in from Europe and the United States, thanks to anti-vaxxers.

In many ways, Brazil is a model for how national vaccination programs can work, and how vaccines can accelerate a country’s development, health and growth. The country’s implementation of widespread affordable vaccinations, coupled with an expanding public health system, caused infant mortality to plummet and contributed to a higher standard of living, a healthier populace and a more robust economy. But today, Brazilian pubic health officials are newly concerned that some of the richest, most developed nations on the planet threaten their success

The idea that this movement (and its entirely-unnecessary and damaging fallout) is limited to the US is clearly nonsense. Given the nature of global travel, refusal to prevent awful diseases is not just some fringe issue in the US, but a matter of global health. That a small subset of ill-informed individuals in the US can have (and are having) a dramatic effect on populations even where vaccination programs are strong and successful reveals just how dangerous the anti-vaccine crowd is.

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About Colin M. Snider

I have a Ph.D. in history, specializing in Latin American History and Comparative Indigenous History. My dissertation focused on Brazil. Beyond Latin America generally, I'm particularly interested in class identities, military politics, human rights, labor, education, music, and nation. I can be found on Twitter at @ColinMSnider.
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One Response to Jenny McCarthy – Bad for Latin America

  1. Sipeti Bixi says:

    Everything Brazilians do is poorly done.
    Brazilians do not know what planning is.
    Brazilians love to condoning bad character.
    Brazilians are rude and arrogant by choice.
    Brazilians are easily manipulated by the faulty media of the country and its corrupt government due to excessive ignorance and stupidity.
    Brazilians have no civic sense and therefore they are individualistic and predators.
    Brazil does not grow, do not improves, just deteriorates due to backward mentality of his ridiculous people.
    Even the street protests they do are ridiculous because they fight effect and not cause.
    Stupidity, ignorance and arrogance blinds them and therefore they do not realize the difference.
    Corruption in Brazil was deployed at all levels of administration and government, including the judiciary.
    In all world rankings of good performance such as in education, health, pollution, corruption, etc.. Brazil occupies the bottom places and keep going down.
    This is the wonderful Brazil of Lula and Dilma.
    Dilma most likely will be re-elected in the first round in the presidential elections in 2014.
    The curse of the ignorance is that the victim do not suspect it.
    The realization of the World Cup in an unequal, corrupt and inefficient country like Brazil is the mother of all evil that can be done against the people, especially the most humble.
    Naturally most Brazilians do not realize that for the reasons set forth above.
    Neither the fact that they are treated like animals in public transports, humiliated in health services both public and private, living in a chaos of criminality, makes them get real.

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