Tracing the Events of Brazil’s Military Dictatorship

This March marks the 50th anniversary since Brazil’s military overthrew the constitutional government of João Goulart, launching a repressive 21-year military regime that killed hundreds, tortured thousands, and transformed Brazil in myriad ways that are often still felt today.

While I’ve often written on particular events and people of the military regime in great detail, such posts are done with the benefit of historical perspective and an understanding of how events that at the time were very complex or even innocuous unfolded in the long-run.

In order to follow the events of the dictatorship on a more daily level, I’ve created a new Twitter account – Ditadura 50 Anos (“Dictatorship 50 Years”) – that will trace the events leading up to the military coup and throughout the military dictatorship on a daily basis, following the events as they unfolded fifty years earlier to that date (e.g., the events of March 13, 1964 will be tweeted this coming March 13). Given the dictatorship lasted 21 years, I suppose this theoretically could last until April of 2031, presuming I (or Twitter) live that long. While blogging has been light, I will be posting a bit more regularly this semester, but the Twitter account will be an interesting spot to check too, to see how the events of Brazil’s military regime unfolded in real time.

For those interested, you can follow @Ditadura50Anos.

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About Colin M. Snider

I have a Ph.D. in history, specializing in Latin American History and Comparative Indigenous History. My dissertation focused on Brazil. Beyond Latin America generally, I'm particularly interested in class identities, military politics, human rights, labor, education, music, and nation. I can be found on Twitter at @ColinMSnider.
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