Karma for Sexists

This is outstanding:

A Brazilian police inspector has lost his job after using Twitter to criticise women who worked for him.

Pedro Paulo Pinho tweeted that out of the 14 women staff of a Rio de Janeiro police station “only one had the talent, courage and determination needed for police work”.

The head of Rio’s police, a woman, had him replaced by a female officer.

Pinho’s defense that his tweet was “misunderstood” certainly rings hollow – when given only 144 characters to express your thoughts, it’s hard to fall back on the “I was taken out of context!” argument. That a woman replaced him seems a particularly just and karmic way to illustrate the error of his sexist attitudes towards women.

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About Colin M. Snider

I have a Ph.D. in history, specializing in Latin American History and Comparative Indigenous History. My dissertation focused on Brazil. Beyond Latin America generally, I'm particularly interested in class identities, military politics, human rights, labor, education, music, and nation. I can be found on Twitter at @ColinMSnider.
This entry was posted in Brazil, Gender and Sexuality, Minutiae, Rio de Janeiro. Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to Karma for Sexists

  1. Samone says:

    Is he really sexist if he can find at least one who he respects? There are women who put on uniforms who are not willing to make the commitment to do the work i.e. get pregnant on purpose before they deploy to active war zones. He maybe serious that of the 14 women under his command only one would he want to enter a dangerous situation with that maybe honest not sexist.

    • While it’s conceivable only 1 out of 14 women are good at their jobs, it doesn’t seem likely on sheer odds alone. Additionally, men at his job could also be terrible, but he doesn’t address their shortcomings in these tweets, instead apparently reserving them for women. And if his superiors feel he has “a history of problems,” I’m willing to give them the benefit of the doubt over him. (And as an inspector, the likelihood of either him or his subordinates being sent to occupy favelas is nil – it wouldn’t be in his or his department’s jurisdiction; that would fall to the Pacifying Police Units [UPPs]).

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